Dogs can’t sweat much, so dog overheating in the summer can be a serious problem – even life threatening. And dogs in hot cars? How many more times do we have to read, “dog dies in hot car” ? It’s crazy.

Even a short time in a hot car can be deadly. A dog’s normal body temperature is about 39°C (102.2°F) If the dog’s temperature gets up to 41°C (105.8°F), irreversible brain damage and death can occur quickly. Just a 2 degree difference between life and death.

Top 7 stupidest excuses to leave a dog in the car on a hot day

  1. The sun’s not even out
  2. I left the window open
  3. I only ran in for a  minute
  4. I left the car running
  5. I’ll keep my eye on him
  6. It’s not too hot for me
  7. I parked in the shade

 

 

First Aid

If you suspect your Morkie might have heat stroke, (excessive panting and drooling, listlessness or unconsciousness) get IMMEDIATE veterinary attention.

In the meantime, wet him down immediately with lukewarm to cool water, not cold water. Bring your dog into the shade and offer drinking water.

Laws are changing around dogs in hot cars

Eleven states have “Good Samaritan” hot car laws, allowing for private citizens to break into a car to save a pet. Most of the laws require that the person must first try to find the vehicle’s owner and contact law enforcement before attempting to break in. In nearly all the Good Samaritan states, the rescuer isn’t responsible for damages, however, in Indiana, the person is liable for one-half the cost of repairs.

Good Samaritan laws apply here:

Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Indiana
Massachusetts
Ohio
Oregon
Tennessee
Vermont
Wisconsin

Hot asphalt is a thing too

 When the air is 77 degrees, the asphalt can quickly heat up to 125!

At 87 degrees air temperature, the pavement can go up to 143 degrees!

 


And from Dogtime, some helpful information:

If you have been walking on hot pavement with your dog, look for these signs that their paws are burned or injured.

Limping or attempting to stop walking.

Licking or chewing at paw pads.

Darkening of skin on or around paw pads.

Blisters, peeling, or redness.

Any kind of damage to the bottom of the paws.

 

More on Hot asphalt awareness




Let's make this the last year of dogs left in hot cars

 

See it? Report it!

Call 9-1-1 to report a dog locked in a car on a hot day.  Are you allowed to break the windows if the dog’s in visible distress? Legally, no, in some places even the police can’t. Would that stop most of us? No.

Pledge you'll never do it

There’s never a reason to leave your dog in a hot car. “Just running in to the store” or “I’ll leave my a/c on” …  Just not worth the chance. Don’t leave dogs in hot cars. Simple, right?

Spread the word

Remind friends nad family that leaving your dog in the car’s not cool.

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