10 Holiday Dangers for your small dog

10 Holiday Dangers for your small dog

Can dogs eat turkey? Can dogs eat onions? Chocolate? What if my dog eats tinsel? Here are the answers, and more holiday tips to keep your small dog safe on the holidays.
 

holiday hazards for dogs

The Top Ten Holiday Hazards for your Morkie

 

  1. Raisins and grapes
  2. Nuts
  3. Toxic holiday plants
  4. Tinsel
  5. Electric cords, lights
  6. Wrapping paper, ribbons, ties
  7. Onions, chives, garlic
  8. Chocolate
  9. Turkey, bones and fat
  10. Tree preservative

Raisins and grapes are very toxic for dogs. Although scientists don’t know exactly why, this phenomenon is well documented. Dogs of any age or breed can be affected. Grape/raisin toxicity can lead to suddenly kidney failure in some dogs, but not all.

Just another reason to ban fruit cake from your home.

Toxic holiday plants – two of the worst are holly and mistletoe which can cause gastrointestinal problems, difficulty breath and even heart failure!

 

Nuts. Most nuts are not good for dogs and some are downright dangerous. Macadamia nuts and black walnuts can be lethal in large enough doses. Others like peanuts (not salted, roasted or spiced) and plain cashews are “OK” for dogs in small amounts, but really, they’re best avoided since they’re also a choking hazard for a small dog like a Morkie.

Tinsel and other ornaments – eeewwww, shiny object! Tinsel can be sharp, and if it wraps itself around the intestines or balls up in the stomach, it can mean major surgery to save your pet’s life.

Turkey bones, fat and skin should be kept well out of reach of pets. Cooked bones especially, revery dangerous. After they’re eaten, bones can break off in shards and puncture an animal’s intestines.

Turkey itself can be quite fatty for a dog, unless you stick to a plain piece of white meat with no skin and no gravy. Otherwise your Morkie could get an upset stomach or even a bout of painful pancreatitis.

Onions are, surprisingly, quite toxic for dogs and cats They contain an ingredient called thiosulphate which can damage red blood cells and lead to anemia. In the same family, garlic, chives and leeks should be avoided as well. Some experts say that garlic, prepared properly for dogs, isn’t dangerous and in fact, is good for your pet. But the benefits don’t seem worth it.

 

Chocolate contains the toxin theobromine. We can easily metabolize theobromine, but dogs process it much more slowly, so it builds up to toxic levels in their system. A small amount can cause major gastrointestinal distress; and a large amount, can even lead to death.

Wrapping paper, ribbons, ties are all attractive to dogs, and all can get lodged in your dog’s stomach or intestines, causing illness and pain.

Electric cords, lights. Curious puppies and kittens can get caught up in the excitement of lights, and bite through, burning themselves and shorting the wires. Keep them out of reach, and/or tape them down.

Tree water. Commercial preservatives typically contain some kind of fertilizer, some type of sugar, and fungicides. Some contain other ingredients such as aluminium sulphate.

The amount that a child or pet could consume isn’t poisonous, but will cause a stomach upset and vomiting.

Christmas tree preservatives aren’t necessary, according to experts – just fresh water is all you need to minimize needles dropping and keep the tree from being super dried out. If you really want to add something, try 1/4 cup corn syrup mixed into 1 quart of water. Keep the tree basin filled.

And a big danger during the holidays

morkie running in field good quality photo

Running away. With people coming and going, the doorbell ringing, and lengthy goodbyes at the door, your Morkie has plenty of chances to sneak out and dash off into the night. Keep him in another room or safe in a carrier cage or kennel while your guests are coming and going.

Can dogs eat turkey?

What to do if your Morkie does eat turkey bones

Don’t panic.

Don’t try to make your dog throw up; better, say experts, to let the bones work their way through….UNLESS your dog is pacing, upset, choking, gagging or licking his lips a lot (a sign of anxiety). In that case, contact your Vet or an Emergency Vet right away.

If he seems alright, feed only soft foods for the next few days, such as rice or white bread. Keep him calm and quiet, and monitor his poop for the bones or bone fragments. 

Keep your dog calm and quiet for the next few days. Monitor his poop carefully for bones or bone fragments. 

If your Morkie has any of these symptoms, contact your Vet immediately:

  • difficulty going poop
  • black or bloody stools
  • vomiting
  • no appetite
  • diarrhea
  • seems to have abdominal pain.  

More tips and ideas for the holidays, including gifts for dog lovers.

Our new website is ready!

Our new website is ready!

Hope you enjoy this new site…. we’ve added more content for you, and much larger pictures.

Some of your favourite pages are easier to find than ever:

And guess who has a MORKIE!??

singer Drake

 

Here’s Drake in Toronto with his new Morkie. Left, the Morkie breeder. (Sorry we didn’t get her name)

 

See the other celeb pups here.

And a whole new album of Morkie puppies.

Do you have a picture you’d like to share? Please send it along! Just email to [email protected]

 

How big will your puppy get?

morkie worksheet

A lot of people have been asking this lately, so there’s a page dedicated to the subject, including a worksheet you can download and use to figure it out.

Not an exact science, but this should be helpful.

(And did you know that one of the parent dogs, the Yorkie, used to be a lot bigger?  Check it out.)

 

 

 

Feedback? Comments? Kudos?

Please share your thoughts on the new site, and anything you’d like to see that we’ve missed…  here’s the contact form.

 

Phew, time to take a rest!

 

Yorkshire Terrier on pillow

Happy Morkie Valentine’s Day!

Happy Morkie Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day Morkie fans! A couple of reminders for the day to keep your Morkie safe….

Chocolate can literally kill your Morkie!

It’s the Theobromine in chocolate that can poison your Morkie.  The darker the chocolate, the more deadly. Just a single square of Baker’s Chocolate can be enough to cause serious illness and even death, according to Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Typical early symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, increased thirst, bloated stomach and restlessness. This usually happens 1 to 4 hours after the dog has eaten chocolate. Without treatment, seizures and muscle spasms follow, then cardiac failure (coma) and death. If you suspect your Morkie has had chocolate, get him to the Vet or emergency clinic right away.

 

 

Dogs can’t eat candy

 

Morkies are sweet enough! Even if the candy doesn’t have chocolate in it, high levels of sugar can send your Morkie into a mild diabetic coma. Plus, getting him used to sweet treats sets the stage for annoying begging, tooth decay and overweight. Remember, no Porkie Morkies 🙂

 

Artificial sweetener can be deadly for dogs

Xylitol is a next-generation sweetener that is in a lot of foods and treats. And it’s very toxic for pets. Although Xylitol is found naturally in berries, plums, etc. even small amounts of Xylitol in the manufactured form, can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), seizures, liver failure or death in dogs.

 

 

6 more things that can make your Morkie very sick

  1. alcohol of any kind – wine, beer, liquor
  2. grapes and raisins – experts don’t really know why, just that only a couple of grapes or raisins can lead to seizures, coma and death
  3. Macadamia nuts can bring on vomiting, tremors, joint pain and diarrhea. They’re extremely toxic for dogs.
  4. Garlic and onions are surprisingly toxic to dogs and cats. That’s because they contain chemicals that damage red blood cells in some animals, to the point where the cells can’t carry oxygen throughout the body. Cooking these foods does not make them any safer.
  5. Avocado, especially the pit, will bring on severe diarrhea and vomiting in your Morkie.
  6. Cellophane, ribbons and glittery stuff that chocolates and gifts are wrapped in, can get lodged in your dog’s intestine, making expensive emergency surgery necessary to save his life. Keep all wrappings out of harm’s way.

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