A Look at Custom Pet Tags

A Look at Custom Pet Tags

Customized pet ID tags feature information can include personal messages, information about medical conditions or dietary needs. Made-to-order tags can be engraved, embossed, personalized, and reflective.

Engraved tags are available in different colours and styles such as bone, round, square, and more. They cost as little as $3.00. Large tags may have five lines of information and small may have only three lines of engraved text.

Humane societies and rescue organizations recommend that dogs and cats wear these tags, which contain information to enable someone encountering a stray animal to contact the owner.

The tags in the picture above, are just a small sampling of what’s available on etsy.com  amazing stuff!

Both sides of tags can have engraved text. Tags can have engraved art work and logos of the customer’s choice. Laser engraved tags displaying information on both sides are expensive. Personalized engraved tags can be made on order. Both computer and hand-engraved pet tags are available in the market.

Same day shipping; great deal. Click to learn more about Premiertags on etsy

Wear-proof and sturdy personalized pet tags can have engraved text on both the sides. The text may contain two phone numbers, and vet and medical information.

If you’re willing to pay a reward for the return of your Morkie, say so on the tag.

Tags can be designed in different shapes, sizes and colours. Light-weight tags come in stainless steel, plastic and aluminum. Personalized pet tags can be bought at as little as $3.00.

Reflective pet tags feature a reflective sticker on their back for reflecting headlights to make drivers aware of pets roaming on the roads.

 

Reflective pet tags were introduced a decade ago. They are brightly coloured stickers that shine. The reflective coating is placed on non-engraved side of the tags. The coating reflects only in very low light conditions.

Looking for a new collar?

 

dog collars from amazon

It’s a dog’s breakfast: trying to figure out what’s in pet food

It’s a dog’s breakfast: trying to figure out what’s in pet food

The pet food industry sums up what people think about advertising when they’re feeling especially cynical.

It’s shady, sketchy and more than a little dishonest.

Descriptions are twisted and turned. Words are left out. Others are honed to a fine edge, perfect to stick in your eye.

Does it have to be this hard?

No, it doesn’t. But this is big business, very big business. It’s estimated that last year alone, in just the United States, we spent more than $23 BILLION on pet food. So no wonder the stakes are so high when it comes to competition. Even the tiniest increase in market share can deliver hundreds of thousands of dollars to a company’s bottom line.

And it’s why pet food makers take short cuts, use the cheapest possible ingredients and hate to follow rules and regulations. They just don’t want us to know what’s in pet food.
dog looking at kibble on the ground

 

FAIL: What’s in this food?

Unless your Morkie is a vegetarian, you’d expect to find meat in his food. But not so fast… When it comes to the source of protein, there are several things to remember.

  • There’s “meat”
  • There’s meat by-products, and
  • There’s “meat meal”

 

About Meat

“Meat” is the muscle that is stripped off a slaughtered animal, which can include what’s attached, such as fat, skin, sinew, nerve and blood vessels.

If a pet food says “meat” instead of the specific source of meat like beef, lamb or chicken, then beware. You don’t know where the meat has come from. It can be from animals that didn’t make it to the slaughterhouse and died on the way (The infamous 4-D meats, dead, dying, diseased and disabled.) It can be road kill. It can be other dogs, picked up after they’ve been euthanized at the pound or shelter.

Bottom line, look for the specific source of meat.

 

Meat by-products

plate of chicken feetBy-products are the polite word for sh*t you wouldn’t consider eating or feeding to your pet. Chicken by-products for example, include beaks, feet, the head, bones, intestines and even some feathers that stick to the rotting by-products.

Again, if the source of meat by-products isn’t name, the nightmare doubles. It’s disgusting parts from unknown or mystery animals. At least beef by-products, for example, come from cattle despite being parts your don’t think can be food.

Bottom line, avoid by products. And especially avoid meat by-products, versus a named protein by-product.

 

Meal meal

Author Ann N. Martin describes a rendering plant in her book, Food Pets Die For. By-products and waste from the slaughterhouse pile up on the factory floor. Maggots thrive in the barrels of dead dogs and cats, snakes, roadkill, deer, foxes, spoiled grocery store meats still in their foam packaging and more.

This stuff is then picked up by front end loader and dumped into a huge vat, where it’s boiled and boiled — or rendered — down into a concentrated sludge of horrifying goop. At the same time, a grinder rips into the mess, popping bones and joins, and tearing skin apart. After cooking and grinding, the mess is spun by centrifugal fore to remove the fat. It’s measured and added back in to the food as “animal fat.” Again, not identified by type of animal. Because how could it be?

Finally the rendered material is dried to a highly concentrated protein powder.

Bottom line, if a meat meal is made from an identified source of protein, such as beef, it does offer more protein, although it’s from pretty unappetizing parts of the animal. But “meat meal” or even worse, “meat by-product meal” means you can’t get a worse food to feed your Morkie.

Look for a specific type of meat in your Morkie’s food. Period. Chicken meat, beef meat, lamb meat and so on.