Your Morkie’s amazing nose

Your Morkie’s amazing nose

A dog’s sense of smell is amazing. Dogs have 300 million scent receptors compared to our 6 million, and can smell early stages of cancer, a diabetic attack, even 1 bedbug deep in a mattress.  There’s only one word to describe a dog’s sense of smell:

amazing

It’s hard to picture just how powerful a dog’s sense of smell can be: anywhere from 10,000 to 100,000 better than ours!

Picture 2,000,000 barrels of apples. Your Morkie could snuff out ONE BAD APPLE from the 2 million barrels!

 

rotten apple

Who smelled it better?

OK, to recap: the number of receptor cells that make up a dog’s sense of smell: 300,000,000. In people, 6,000,000.  A dog’s ability to process that sense of smell is 10,000 to 100,000 times more efficient than ours. And the part of a dog’s brain that is devoted to analyzing smells is, proportionally speaking, 40 times bigger.

Keep your Morkie’s nose in good shape – read more.

Just look at what Morkies can snuff out!

  • bedbugs – even just one, deep in a mattress
  • early stage cancer in small samples of human urine, saliva or expelled breath
  • the spikes and drops in human blood sugar that is diabetes
  • dogs can smell fear, anxiety, even sadness
  • adrenaline, so they know if someone’s about to run
  • a dog can detect CDs and DVDs (layers of ‘polycarbonate plastic) in bags and packages, inside a truck. These dogs alert police to large stashes of pirated movies
  • narcolepsy service dogs can detect a subtle biochemical change in the form of an odour when an attack is coming on
  • migraines – dogs can alert sufferers up to 2 hours ahead, that a headache is on its way

We come home and smell beef stew cooking. Your Morkie can smell each and every spice, ingredient and liquid — separately. According to author (“Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know”) and dog expert Alexandra Horowitz, while we might notice if our coffee has had a teaspoon of sugar added to it, a dog could detect a teaspoon of sugar in a million gallons of water, or two Olympic-sized pools worth. Another dog scientist explains that dogs smell in 3-D; each nostril can register different scents separately.

Nose to nose who wins out?

Dogs – 1 zillion

People – 7

Who does this!!?? STOLEN MORKIE!

Who does this!!?? STOLEN MORKIE!

Teddy, an 11-year-old Maltese and Yorkie mix, is blind and needs life saving diabetes medication. His owner says time is running out.

“He now has missed four shots. He’s in dire need of his medication and he needs constant water,” said his owner, Tara Cameron Harris.

Police believe Heather Ryan, 48, of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, is the thief.

Teddy was taken from the Petco store on Legacy Drive, The Palm Beach Gardensm Florida, around 8 p.m. Saturday, April 21, just minutes before Harris’ family arrived to pick him up from grooming.

Meet the suspect, HEATHER RYAN, 48, of Palm Beach Gardens

 

Police are looking for Heather Ryan, 48, of Palm Beach Gardens.

It is believed that Ryan may be in Broward County as her personal belongings were found abandoned at the Cypress Creek Tri-Rail Station.

Stolen Morkie is blind and diabetic and can’t survive long without his medications.

More details here at WPTV

Contact Palm Beach Gardens Police if you have any information




Your Morkie and Spring Fever

Your Morkie and Spring Fever

Have you had a long, hard winter? Then you’re probably glad that yesterday was the first day of spring. What about your Morkie? Can he get spring fever?

Absolutely! Most dogs are more energized and eager to get outside when the weather warms up. They’re even more interested in sniffing everything outside, and in extending their walks.

A couple of things to be aware of — always keep your Morkie on a leash and be vigilant that he doesn’t dash out of your house onto the road. It’s a sad fact that every year in the U.S., cars kill 1.2 million dogs each year and 5.4 million cats. Your pets might be more eager than usual to get outside, so watch the door.

 

 

It’s also the time when seasonal allergies start up again. If your Morkie has runny eyes or is sneezing, that could be the problem. Other signs of allergies are itching, and biting at paws and skin. Talk to your Veterinarian, because dogs CAN take Benadryl. Yup, the over-the-counter medication that we take. Be sure you get the CHILDREN’s liquid version, WITHOUT artificial sweeteners or alcohol. And do check with your Vet first.

Some people recommend that you:

  • wipe down your dog’s coat every time he comes in, to remove excess pollen
  • soak his feet in epsom salts to reduce swelling and wash away pollen

And then there’s mud…

Britain’s Daily Mail asked readers to share their best pictures of muddy dogs. I think this one wins! Believe it or not the pup was all cleaned up after just an hour in the tub.

 

 See more muddy dogs on the Daily Mail website.

 

P.S. Another tidbit: Blogger Paul Janson – link – reminds us that “Spring Fever” used to be a real disease, thanks to a long winter with little in the way of fruits and vegetables. Back in the 1700s, spring fever was probably really scurvy – the lack of Vitamin C, and it was a serious, often fatal illness. Read more of Paul’s writing here.

 

Don’t be impressed with AAFCO “approval”

Don’t be impressed with AAFCO “approval”

The Association of American Feed Control Officials, called AAFCO, is a private organization of volunteers in the animal feed feed industry — including people from the pet food industry itself.

It is not mandated by any laws; it does not write laws or change them.

AAFCO sets standards for nutritional adequacy for a wide variety of animal feed, including cattle feed, feed for commercially raised rabbits, pig feed, dog and cat food, etc.
In my personal opinion, AAFCO regulation falls FAR short of protecting the welfare of our pets; here are some reasons why I say this.

1. How AAFCO tests pet foods

Food is either analyzed in the lab, or AAFCO runs feed trails.

  • the feed trial includes 8 dogs minimum, or more
  • 25% can be removed during the test – so the test could be conducted with just SIX DOGS
  • as long as the remaining animals don’t lose more than 15% of their body weight during the 26 week trial, the food is approved

AAFCO states clearly in its mandate, that it is setting standards for adequate nutrition. Not good nutrition, not particularly healthy. Adequate to keep the animal alive.

 

AAFCO food trials

 

2. FEED and FOOD is very different

There’s a big difference between FEED and FOOD.

AAFCO is mostly comprised of Feed Control Officials. These are state department of agriculture representatives who work together on feed that livestock eats. It’s nothing like our FOOD or what we think of as our pet’s FOOD. AAFCO is all about FEED.

Feed is all about fattening commercially raised animals for slaughter with the minimum resources possible; food is about building and maintaining good health.

One difference alone – FEED is allowed, per FDA, to contain euthanized pets and pesticide-laden grains and vegetables that wouldn’t be allowed for human consumption. (www.truthaboutpetfoods)

 

3. AAFCO doesn’t actually approve pet food

AAFCO does not approve, certify or reject pet food. Wording on pet food actually says that it MEETS the nutritional requirements established by AAFCO. Those standards, as mentioned, are what’s needed for adequate nutrition, in highly processed pet foods.

 

What does AAFCO really mean

 

4. These are the people who brought you the Label Laws

Remember these rules? You can read about them in detail on my blog, What’s on Your Dog’s Menu, but basically it’s a serious of weasel statements that tell manufactures what to call their products when they don’t contain a lot of meat.

For example, let’s look at Cesar Classics Filet Mignon Flavor, made by food giant Mars. 

 

It contains no filet mignon; it contains nothing like what we think of as beef.

Instead, this Cesar Classics flavour contains:

  • beef by-products – this is leftover, non-meat which can include lungs, stomach, and intestines (required to be freed of feces) from slaughtered mammals. It is not the flesh or ‘meat’ which has been removed for human food or other animal feed products.

It’s not even the ‘acceptable’ kinds of slaughterhouse leftovers like gristle, pieces of fatty tissue, meat from the animal’s head and feet; connective tissue – all of this goes into hot dogs and processed meat for people.

  • animal liver – liver is a good source of protein; the problem here is, what kind of animal?
  • meat by-products – again, the leftover waste from the slaughterhouse, but what kind of animal(s) are we talking about?
  • chicken by-products – this is not chicken ‘meat;’ it is the scrap, and can include feet, backs, livers, lungs, chicken heads, undeveloped eggs, etc.

….along with artificial colouring, sodium nitrite and more.

The total protein content of this food: 8%.

Remember, it’s the food name that counts

 


More reading on AAFCO and its role

Dog Food Advisor – https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/choosing-dog-food/animal-by-products/

Truth About Pet Food – http://truthaboutpetfood.com/should-my-pets-food-be-aafco-approved/

AAFCO official site – http://www.aafco.org/Consumers

How to read a dog food label – Part I

How to read a dog food label – Part I

First in an informal series on commercial dog foods.

When you’re shopping for commercial dog food – canned or kibble – here is an important place to start: the first 5 ingredients listed on the label.

Even though dog food labels may list dozens of ingredients, it’s the first 5 that matter.

That’s because dog food ingredients are listed in order of weight, so the closer to the top of the list, the more of that ingredient in the dog food.

Let’s look at one notably horrible dog food and one notably good commercial dog food.

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition (dry food)

Ol’ Roy is the store brand, or private label brand, of Walmart. It’s manufactured by Doane Pet Food, which is owned by Mars Pet Food Division. Virtually any website that compares commercial dog foods rates this one at the bottom of the list. (Mars makes other cheap pet foods like Pedigree, Cesar and Nutro.)

 

The first 5 ingredients in Ol’ Roy

  1. Ground Yellow Corn
  2. Meat and Bone Meal
  3. Soybean Meal
  4. Poultry By-Product Meal
  5. Animal Fat

 

Are dogs corn eaters? No, but that’s the first ingredient and it’s CHEAP filler.

Meat and bone meal is a nasty mix of waste animal tissues, including bone. Very hard for dogs to digest. And what kind of animal does the meat and bone meal come from? Could be any combination of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats…

Soybean meal does contain 48% protein. It’s probably included to boost the overall protein content of this food but it’s much lower quality than protein from meat.

Poultry by-product meal is made from slaughterhouse leftovers like chicken feet, backs, lungs and heads. If these leftovers are edible, they’re added to people food like bologna, sausage and hot dogs.

Not edible? Then add it to dog food, where it’s rendered (cooked at very high temperatures) until it is a dry meal.

Animal fat – again, what kind of a animal are we talking about?? If it doesn’t say, you don’t know.

And that means it can be spoiled supermarket meat, dead, diseased or dying cattle (the Three Ds of the meat world); road kill and even euthanized pets!!! It’s all legal.

AND, generic animal fat is often preserved with BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole). BHA is a suspected cancer causing agent. It’s also used in making rubber and cosmetics.

 

Mystery Meat

MEAT is great for dogs because it’s a source of protein that’s complete. It contains all all ten essential amino acids — nutrients dogs cannot live without. Plus, dogs can easily digest it, especially compared to inferior protein sources like corn or grain. But if the meat is not named, it can be literally anything, including

 

Whenever a pet food does not name the TYPE of animal, but just says “animal” or “meat” instead of, for example,  “beef” or “chicken,” your guard should go up. That’s because the meat can be almost anything, and changes depending on what’s the cheapest in the marketplace.

MEAT BY-PRODUCTS are even scarier – by-products are slaughterhouse waste. The stuff that they won’t even put in hot dogs! The stuff they sweep up off the floor at the end of the day.

Purina calls this –

“nutrient-rich organ meats”

Sorry, but the rest of the world calls it crap! For example… “deboned chicken” is  literally chicken meat that we’d eat. “Poultry by-products” can be what’s left after the ‘real’ meat is stripped off. Stuff like the head, the feet, neck and internal organs that no other food processor wants.

 

 

 

In summary, AVOID –

  • commercial dog food that has “meat”
  • instead, go for a named product, like beef, chicken, lamb, etc.
  • and avoid poultry, and go for chicken, turkey, duck, etc.
  • avoid by-products, meat or otherwise

 


Here’s an example of a label that you can understand, and that actually looks good.

Blue Life Protection Formula Chicken & Brown Rice

Blue Life Protection Formula Chicken & Brown Rice

Top 5 ingredients:

  1. Deboned Chicken
  2. Chicken Meal
  3. Brown Rice
  4. Barley
  5. Oatmeal

Now THAT sounds like something you’d want to feed to your Morkie!

 

To see how your dog’s food compares, check out Blue Buffalo’s web page Take the Test.

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