Morkie lovers: how to stop a dog from barking

Morkie lovers: how to stop a dog from barking

Do you love your Morkie to bits – until he’s barking like a maniac? What if you knew how to stop dog barking? Once you know WHY he’s barking, you’ll see HOW to stop it.

Dogs bark. It’s what they do. But excessive barking can be a real problem. It can cause problems with the neighbours, not to mention get on YOUR nerves. Crazy barking all the time isn’t OK – it means your dog is stressed out, and so are you. Here are some solutions to stop dog barking when it’s over the top.

“Dog barking turns into a problem when the barking becomes loud, unwanted, inappropriate or excessive.”

4 main reasons why dogs bark too much

When you figure out WHY your Morkie is barking too much, you can figure out HOW to resolve it. The main reasons dogs bark too much are:

  1. Territorial barking – distract your Morkie to stop this
  2. Nervousness – address whatever’s making your Morkie anxious. Could it be Separation Anxiety?
  3. Fearful response – work to build your Morkie’s trust. If he’s nervous of something else, remove him from the situation.
  4. The dog is bored – exercise, exercise, exercise. Remember, a tired dog is a good dog.

Dog barking is a problem when the barking becomes loud, unwanted, inappropriate or excessive.

 

problem when the barking becomes loud, unwanted, inappropriate or excessive.




Try a time out

When your Morkie is really wound up and barking incessantly, speak in a calm, quiet and controlled way, telling him to sit and stop. 

Put your hand gently but firmly on his back.  Get his attention in a calm and quiet way and assure him he’s a good dog. 

Still not working?

It’s time for the old favourite we use on the kids: a time out. 

Firmly lift your Morkie and place him in another room, away from your attention.

Again, don’t give eye contact and now, stop talking to him.

Breeds that bark the most

These dogs bark a LOT!

Beagles
Fox Terriers
Yorkshire Terriers
Miniature Schnauzer
Cairn Terrier
West Highland White Terrier

Also high on the list – 

Pekingese
Chihuahuas
Poodles
Doberman Pinschers
Lhasa Apsos
Maltese
Pomeranian

Right:  according to Pethelpful.com, small dogs kept in groups tend to bark more.

Breeds that bark the least

Basenji and Shiba Inu dogs don’t really bark; instead they are yodelling and other unusual sounds, not common to most dog breeds. More quiet breeds –

Whippet
Italian Greyhound
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Golden Retriever
Borzoi
Saluki

These huge dogs could bark, but seem to rely on their size instead, to get their message across:

Mastiff
Bernese Mountain Dog
Great Pyrenees
Saint Bernard
Great Dane
Newfoundland
Bull Mastiff

What NOT to do when your Morkie is barking too much

Don’t shout. To your dog this means that you’re barking too. He’ll only bark MORE.

Don’t ignore single, high-pitched barks. They can indicate your dog is in pain.

Do practice positive reinforcement. When your Morkie is NOT barking, praise him and show love. When he’s barking, immediately walk away, and avoid eye contact.

Sounds strange, but teach him TO bark or “speak”. Then you can teach him to STOP.




In 101 Dalmatians, the dogs explain the Twilight Bark

The Twilight Bark

Many people must have noticed how dogs like to bark in the early evening. Indeed, twilight has sometimes been called “Dogs’ Barking Time.” Busy town dogs bark less than country dogs, but all dogs know all about the Twilight Barking. It is their way of keeping in touch with distant friends, passing on important news, enjoying a good gossip.

— Dodie Smith, The Hundred and One Dalmatians

How do you handle excess barking? Any tips?

Why does my Morkie bark so much?

Why does my Morkie bark so much?

Ever wonder what your Morkie is trying to tell you when he barks?

If he’s like most dogs, the TYPE of bark will help you figure it out. Dogs have four basic types of barks, depending on their mood and the circumstances.

These are:

  • Territorial
  • Nervous
  • Bored
  • Fearful

And while barking is natural — it’s an important way for dogs to communicate — sometimes problems can develop. So how to deal with the different kinds of barking especially when it gets over-the-top?  The underlying principle is pretty simple: reward good behaviour and ignore bad behaviour.

 

Four Types of Barking

Four types of barking

 

1. The territorial bark: distract your Morkie as soon as he starts barking. Catch his attention with a treat or by playing. Every time the bark cycle is broken, it sends the message that “quiet” will get the most reward.

2. Nervous barking usually comes about when your Morkie is nervous, lonely or suffering from separation anxiety. Make sure your Morkie gets as much of your undivided attention as possible when you are together, and if you’re out all day, is it possible for someone to come by mid-day and take the dog out for a walk? Or, try leaving the radio on.

3. Bored or lonely barking can be controlled with lots of good exercise; being walked on a leash reinforces the natural order of things: you are the pack leader and your Morkie can relax and follow. This helps settle and calm a dog. Plus it’s a great way to burn off your dog’s excess energy, while you burn a few calories at the same time!

4. Fear barking – if your dog has been traumatized or hasn’t had enough socialization, you may suffer through his ‘fear barking’ or acting out. This is a more difficult problem to address, but it can be managed.

Desensitization to the trigger, along with more socialization with people and other dogs, will go a long way to reduce fear barking. Work with your Morkie to get him to focus on you, so that you establish communication he can rely on.

Don’t forget to praise your Morkie for those quiet, non-barking times too. If he’s barking because he sees another dog and is fearful (tail down, ears flattened, crouching position)… the best and easiest solution is to remove the source of fear – the other dog, by taking your Morkie out of the scene.

 

Remember: Reward the good, ignore the bad

 

reward the good and ignore the bad

 


 

Twilight bark

Many people must have noticed how dogs like to bark in the early evening. Indeed, twilight has sometimes been called “Dogs’ Barking Time.” Busy town dogs bark less than country dogs, but all dogs know all about the Twilight Barking. It is their way of keeping in touch with distant friends, passing on important news, enjoying a good gossip.

— Dodie Smith, The Hundred and One Dalmatians

 

NEXT: is de-barking a solution?

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